Brittain, Vera, Diary, 22 August 1915

00000298-14.jpg
Description: 
Diary of Vera Brittain

Tabs

Case Study: 
From Youth to Experience: Vera Brittain’s Work for Peace in Two World Wars
Creator: 
Brittain, Vera
Source: 
diary
Date: 
22 August 1915
Collection/Fonds: 
Contributer: 
McMaster University Libraries
Rights: 
Vera Brittain estate; McMaster University has a non-exclusive licence to publish this document.

Identifier: 
00000298-14
Language: 
eng
Type: 
image
Format: 
jpg
Transcript: 

said humbly, "that you know him much better than I do."
I smiled at this. "I don't think I do" I said, "I really know him very little indeed."
When we got back to the house we found Mrs. Leighton & Roland wandering about in the garden. After wandering a little ourselves we finally all came into a group on the front door steps, where we discussed a variety of things. We talked of my family a little, & the Swinburnian impression (which seemed to amuse them greatly) which Father had given me by his description of Mr. Leighton. Then Mrs. Leighton began to talk of young men, & said that Roland was different from the rest because there was so much glamour about him, whereas about the normal young men there was not the slightest scrap until he was well past thirty. Edward & Victor were cases in point; Victor had just a very a little, but Edward, the immaculate & somewhat inhuman, none at all. I agreed with her on the subject of Roland and said there was a great deal of glamour about him. And it is true too, & is not just because I would think so, as some might say. The conversation continued for quite an hour & then it began to get cold on the steps & we gradually dispersed. Roland asked me to come for a walk again, & we went towards the tennis court gate. Clare & Evelyn, with a slight abatement of the tactfulness which has (most markedly & embarassingly, as I told Roland) characterized them throughout, asked Mrs. Leighton if they should accompany us.
"Well, I don't know if they want you, dear", said Mrs. Leighton, looking at us rather dubiously. Roland, who rather obviously wanted to get rid of them, went on without taking the slightest notice of them.