Brittain, Vera, Diary, 22 August 1915

00000298-28.jpg
Description: 
Diary of Vera Brittain

Tabs

Case Study: 
From Youth to Experience: Vera Brittain’s Work for Peace in Two World Wars
Creator: 
Brittain, Vera
Source: 
diary
Date: 
22 August 1915
Collection/Fonds: 
Contributer: 
McMaster University Libraries
Rights: 
Vera Brittain estate; McMaster University has a non-exclusive licence to publish this document.

Identifier: 
00000298-28
Language: 
eng
Type: 
image
Format: 
jpg
Transcript: 

was nothing but a sweet & open generosity, which treats me unreservedly as an equal who shared with her her love for Roland, and there was never the least hint that she thought she was being generous. I could have fallen down and worshipped her. She said our position had been a cause of serious consideration to her for some time. When Roland came back from the front she asked him if he & I were engaged & he looked rather puzzled & said he did'nt think Vera would say that we were engaged exactly. And the night he brought me to Lowestoft she said to him "How am I to treat Vera?" & he said again a little puzzled & half-laughingly that we were engaged -- for three years or the duration of the war. This seemed to trouble her for she said that was absurd; if we cared for one another enough to be engaged we cared enough to belong to one another permanently, & he said that of course we did and the reservation really meant nothing. She said to him "Traditionally I suppose I ought to detest her; but I don't, I love her."
Again she told me that one night she had been reading an account of the terrible sufferings of the wounded prisoners in a hospital in Germany, till she could not help crying and then she turned to Clare and said "It comforts me so much to think that Vera Brittain is waiting and watching too."
She said she thought that where Roland's chief fascination lay was the fact that he was that rare combination, an artist and a gentleman. I loved this description of him, for it is so true and in all its briefness so exact. the intellectual man who is not a domineering bounder and has the same consideration for men & women as the ordinary good-natured person who has been taught little else but